HOW TO PAINT YOUR WAY TO CALM-PART 2

Tenka2

In part 1 of this series, Painting Your Way to Calm, I discussed the pros and cons of the different paints types.   Once you’ve selected the paint you wish to use the next step is to pick the appropriate brushes.  I  cover the shape, bristle type, size, usage and care below:

Brushtypes

Brush Shape

  1. Round:  Used to paint details.  Offers control and accuracy.
  2. Flat:  Used for big washes and filling in areas.
  3. Bright Brush:  Similar to a flat brush but with shorter bristles. Good for short strokes.
  4. Filbert:  Good for making soft edges and for blending.
  5. Fan:  Used for blending.  Can be used dry or loaded with paint for texture.  Not for watercolors.
  6.  Angle:  Used for details, shading or color blocking.  Not for oils.
  7. Mop:  Ideal for large watercolor washes or ‘mopping’ up excess water.
  8. Rigger:  Great for making long continuous outlines.  Used for lettering.

Bristle Type

Synthetic:

  • Used with acrylics and watercolors.  Not good for oil since cleaning with turpentine will destroy them.
  • Being more porous than natural hair makes them versatile for using with different mediums and surfaces.
  • Strong and durable.

Natural:

  • Good for oil and watercolors.  Does not hold up well to the chemicals in acrylic paint.
  • Often made from a mixture of animal hair.  Sable is the highest quality.  Camel (not from a camel) use the natural tip of the hair versus hair that has been cut.
  • Stiffer brushes will leave stroke marks and texture.  Softer bristles give smooth results and better blending.

Brush Size

  • Choose a size proportionate to the canvas or other medium being used.
  • Holding the brush close to the ferrule (metal band) gives the most control. Holding near the end results in loose strokes.

Usage and Cleaning

  • Use different brushes for each paint type to preserve the bristle quality.
  • Clean by first wiping the brush with a paper towel or cloth.  Rinse acrylics and watercolors in lukewarm water and clean oil with a solvent such as turpentine.  Wipe down again and wash with a gentle soap.  Rinse, reshape and wrap in paper towel or cloth to dry.
  • Store brushes upright.

2e293812e5b01cdae3e084df6bc3a2ed

Look for Part 3 next week, which will wrap up the ‘Painting Your Way to Calm’ series.  I will discuss the various painting surfaces and how to set up your work space.  You will then be ready to paint your way to calm.

-kat

image source:   Studio of Artist Tenka Gammelgaard, paint brushes, Justine Taylor

 

One thought on “HOW TO PAINT YOUR WAY TO CALM-PART 2

  1. Pingback: INSPIRING LINKS FOR THE WEEK - Blue Zelia

Leave a Reply